Early weight-loss surgery may improve type 2 diabetes, blood pressure outcomes

Washington, DC - Despite similar weight loss, teens who had gastric bypass surgery were significantly more likely to have remission of both type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, compared to adults who had the same procedure. Results are from an NIH-funded study comparing outcomes in the two groups five years after surgery.

NIH study finds heavily processed foods cause overeating and weight gain

Washington, DC - People eating ultra-processed foods ate more calories and gained more weight than when they ate a minimally processed diet, according to results from a National Institutes of Health study. The difference occurred even though meals provided to the volunteers in both the ultra-processed and minimally processed diets had the same number of calories and macronutrients.

Dr. Redfield on National Infant Immunization Week, Safety and Effectiveness of Vaccines

Atlanta, Georgia - As CDC Director and as a physician, I have and continue to wholeheartedly advocate for infant immunization.  More importantly, as a father and grandfather I have ensured all of my children and grandchildren are vaccinated on the recommended schedule. Vaccines are safe. Vaccines do not cause autism. Vaccine-preventable diseases are dangerous.

Arsenic in drinking water may change heart structure

Dallas, Texas - Drinking water that is contaminated with arsenic may lead to thickening of the heart’s main pumping chamber in young adults, a structural change that increases the risk for future heart problems, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, an American Heart Association journal.

NIH researchers identify method to verify if children fasted before medical testing

Washington, DC - Testing the blood for free fatty acids could help doctors verify if children fasted before undergoing tests for diabetes or other medical conditions, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health. Their study appears in Pediatrics.