NIH research program to explore the transition from acute to chronic pain

Washington, DC - The National Institutes of Health has launched the Acute to Chronic Pain Signatures (A2CPS) program to investigate the biological characteristics underlying the transition from acute to chronic pain. The effort will also seek to determine the mechanisms that make some people susceptible and others resilient to the development of chronic pain. A2CPS is part of the NIH-wide HEAL (Helping to End Addiction Long-term) Initiative, an aggressive, trans-NIH effort to speed scientific solutions to stem the national opioid public health crisis.

Eat Healthy, Be Active

Yuma, Arizona - Have you ever been asked by a doctor or health care provider to lower how much salt, fat, or added sugars you eat? On Saturday, September 15th, the Main Library will host “Eat Healthy, Be Active” at 10:00 a.m. Melissa Wyatt, Yuma County Family, Consumer, and Health Sciences Agent for the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension, will discuss using a variety of spices to add flavor while reducing salt, fat and added sugars.

EXP2 protein helps deadliest malaria parasite obtain nutrients during infection

Washington, DC - Researchers from the National Institutes of Health and other institutions have deciphered the role of a key protein that the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum uses to obtain nutrients while infecting red blood cells. Their study appears in Nature Microbiology.

More patients survive sudden cardiac arrest with new EMS technique

Washington, DC - A new study showed that a change in the type of breathing tube paramedics use to resuscitate patients with sudden cardiac arrest can significantly improve the odds of survival and save thousands of lives. More than 90 percent of Americans who experience sudden cardiac arrest die before, or soon after, reaching a hospital.

Cargill Meat Solutions Recalls Ground Beef Products due to Possible E. coli O157:H7 Contamination

Washington, DC - Cargill Meat Solutions, a Fort Morgan, Colo. establishment, is recalling approximately 25,288 pounds of ground beef products that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced Thursday.