Indiana Resident Sentenced to Over Six Years in Prison for Financing of Terrorism

Indianapolis, Indiana - Samantha Marie Elhassani, aka Samantha Sally, 35, formerly of Elkhart, Indiana, was sentenced by U.S. District Court Judge Philip P. Simon to 78  months in prison and three years of supervised release after pleading guilty to Financing Terrorism, announced Assistant Attorney General for National Security John C. Demers, U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Indiana Thomas L. Kirsch II, FBI Assistant Director of the Counterterrorism Division Jill Sanborn, and FBI Special Agent in Charge of the Indianapolis field office Paul Keenan.

Indiana Resident Sentenced to Over Six Years in Prison for Financing of Terrorism

Indianapolis, Indiana - Samantha Marie Elhassani, aka Samantha Sally, 35, formerly of Elkhart, Indiana, was sentenced by U.S. District Court Judge Philip P. Simon to 78  months in prison and three years of supervised release after pleading guilty to Financing Terrorism, announced Assistant Attorney General for National Security John C. Demers, U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Indiana Thomas L. Kirsch II, FBI Assistant Director of the Counterterrorism Division Jill Sanborn, and FBI Special Agent in Charge of the Indianapolis field office Paul Keenan.

Release of the U.S. Indo-Pacific Strategy-Republic of Korea New Southern Policy Joint Fact Sheet

Washington, DC - Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Japan and Korea Marc Knapper and Republic of Korea Director-General for North American Affairs Ko Yunju met in Seoul on November 13.

United States and ASEAN: A Billion Futures Across the Indo-Pacific

Washington, DC - Senior White House officials met with the leaders of the ten Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Member States to advance our strategic partnership during the 8th U.S.-ASEAN Summit held November 13 (November 14 in Southeast Asia).

Arms Control and International Security Since January 2017

Washington, DC - Good day, everyone.  I’m glad to see you again, Marjolijn [van Deelen] and [Fu] Cong, and it’s a pleasure to take part once again in this important conference.  I’d like to take this opportunity to offer a sort of “wave top” survey of some key developments in U.S. foreign and national security policy over the last four years, at least as seen from the so-called “T” family of bureaus at the U.S. Department of State – that is, the units that report to the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security (an office known in the Department as “T”).