Parkinson's Disease: A Progressive Nervous System Disorder

Rochester, Minnesota - Parkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement. It develops gradually, sometimes starting with a barely noticeable tremor in just one hand. But while a tremor may be the most well-known sign of Parkinson's disease, the disorder also commonly causes stiffness or slowing of movement.

Physician Turns to Mayo for Cancer Care

Rochester, Minnesota - Jim Biles, M.D., understands cancer treatment. A urologist who specializes in cancer surgery, he has spent his career focused on helping people receive the cancer care they need. So at age 72, when Dr. Biles received his own diagnosis of an aggressive type of cancer, he knew how critical it would be to get treatment from someone with experience and expertise.

FDA takes action against Kansas food manufacturer for repeated food safety violations

Wichita, Kansas - The U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas entered a consent decree of permanent injunction today between the United States and Native American Enterprises, LLC, located in Wichita, Kansas; its part-owner, William N. McGreevy; and its production manager, Robert C. Conner.

American Heart Association Launches New Campaign to Increase Bystander CPR Among Latino Millennials

Dallas, Texas - Latino millennials, the youngest major racial or ethnic group in the United States, take center stage in a new video released today to teach them how to save a life using Hands-Only CPR. The video, produced by the American Heart Association (AHA) in conjunction with the Anthem Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Anthem, Inc., showcases Hands-Only CPR, a two-step, easy-to-learn lifesaving technique.

Prevention may be essential to reducing racial disparities in stroke

Washington, DC - Blacks between the ages of 45 and 54 die of strokes at a rate that is three times greater than their white counterparts, according to the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, which looked at stroke incidence and mortality of nearly 30,000 participants over the age of 45 from an ethnically and demographically diverse sample of the U.S. population. The findings suggest that the higher risk of death from strokes in blacks is due mostly to the higher incidence in this population, and not to worse outcomes following stroke.