Political pitfalls in handling Ebola may carry over to Zika

Ann Arbor, Michigan - If the United States responds to Zika the way it did to Ebola—and early indications are that in many ways it is—the country can expect missteps brought about by a lack of health care coordination and a lot of political finger pointing, according to an analysis by the University of Michigan.

Genetically inherited high cholesterol increases long-term risks of coronary heart disease and stroke

Dallas, Texas - Patients who experience high cholesterol due to an inherited genetic disorder from one of their parents heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia are much more likely than those with average cholesterol levels to have diseases caused by hardening of the arteries, including an accelerated onset of coronary heart disease by up to 30 years, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

FDA approves implantable device that changes the shape of the cornea to correct near vision

Washington, DC - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the Raindrop Near Vision Inlay, a device implanted in the cornea (the clear, front surface) of one eye to improve near vision in certain patients with presbyopia. It is the second FDA-approved implantable corneal device for correction of near vision in patients who have not had cataract surgery and the first implantable device that changes the shape of the cornea to achieve improved vision.

Prehypertension during pregnancy could lead to cardiovascular risks

Dallas, Texas - Pregnant women who experience persistent blood pressure elevations in the upper ranges of normal may be at high risk of developing metabolic syndrome and increased cardiovascular risk after giving birth, according to research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

NIH-led effort uses implementation science approaches to reduce mother-to-child HIV transmission

Washington, DC - An emerging field, known as implementation science, may help reduce the nearly 150,000 instances of mother-to-child HIV transmissions that occur annually around the world, mostly in developing countries. A team of scientists and program managers, led by the National Institutes of Health, has been studying a variety of implementation science approaches to prevent mother-to-child transmission and has published the results in a 16-article open-access supplement to the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes.