Restricting calories may improve sleep apnea, blood pressure in obese people

San Francisco, California - Restricting calories may improve obstructive sleep apnea and reduce high blood pressure in obese adults, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s High Blood Pressure Research Scientific Sessions 2014.

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NIH awards aim to improve understanding of cell pathways, development of new therapies

Washington, DC - Building on a successful three-year pilot project, the National Institutes of Health has awarded more than $64 million to six research institutions to create a database of human cellular responses, the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS). Discovering such cell responses will improve scientists’ understanding of cell pathways and aid in the development of new therapies for many diseases.

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If essential tremor interferes with daily activities, treatment may be helpful

Rochester, Minnesota - Essential tremor is among the most common of all movement disorders. Mild essential tremor usually does not require treatment. But if the tremor becomes worse or if it interferes with a person’s daily activities, treatment may be helpful. Medications can often keep essential tremor under control. Rarely, surgery may be used to treat severe cases.

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Mentoring for new cancer survivors

Scottsdale, Arizona - This week, I'd like to put a call out to all of the veteran cancer survivors who are reading and participating on the blog. One of the primary goals for the blog is to support and reassure each other on this journey.

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Aortic valve regurgitation

Rochester, Minnesota - Aortic valve regurgitation or aortic regurgitation, is a condition that occurs when your heart's aortic valve doesn't close tightly. Aortic valve regurgitation allows some of the blood that was just pumped out of your heart's main pumping chamber (left ventricle) to leak back into it.

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Hormone replacement therapy may protect against

Rochester, Minnesota - For a woman carrying a BRCA mutation without a personal history of cancer, hormone replacement therapy, or HT, is usually recommended from the time your ovaries are removed until you turn 50. Beyond that age, the risks of continuing HT for a BRCA mutation carrier are not fully known. So HT is usually stopped around age 50. Going without any hormone therapy after prophylactic oophorectomy may increase the likelihood of some significant health risks, including problems that could affect your bones, heart and brain.

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